The aims of this study were to examine rates of radial artery access in post–coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients undergoing diagnostic catherization and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), whether operators with higher procedural volumes and higher percentage radial use were more likely to perform diagnostic catherization and/or PCI via the radial approach in post-CABG patients, and clinical and procedural outcomes in post-CABG patients who undergo diagnostic catherization and/or PCI via the radial or femoral approach.

The rate of transradial access increased from 1.4% to 18.7% over the study period. Transradial access was associated with decreased mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75 to 0.91), decreased bleeding (OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.51 to 0.63), decreased vascular complications (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.30 to 0.47), increased PCI procedural success (OR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.16; p < 0.0001), and significantly decreased contrast volume across all procedure types. Transradial access was associated with shorter fluoroscopy time for PCI-only procedures but longer fluoroscopy time for diagnostic procedures plus ad hoc PCI and diagnostic procedures only. Operators with a higher rate of transradial access in non-CABG patients were more likely to perform transradial access in patients with prior CABG.

The rate of transradial artery access in patients with prior CABG undergoing diagnostic catheterization and/or PCI has increased over the past decade in the United States, and it was more often performed by operators using a transradial approach in non-CABG patients. Compared with transfemoral access, transradial access was associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with prior CABG.

Source

https://www.jacc.org/doi/10.1016/j.jcin.2021.01.053?utm_medium=email_newsletter&utm_source=jint&utm_campaign=AIP&utm_content=20210331

Tags

Therapeutic Modality ,Interventional Cardiology,Percutaneous Coronary Intervention,Trans catheter Therapy